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Acyclovir: Anti-viral medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medication acyclovir, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Adalimumab: Humira  
Abstract: This handout explains the drug adalimumab. It includes how to take it, what to expect, possible side effects, and cautions.
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 3/2011
After your baclofen trial: Follow-up and self-care  
Abstract: This handout gives instructions for patients to follow after having an injection of baclofen, a muscle relaxant and antispastic drug. Included are side effects, site care, and when to call the doctor.
Author: Center for Pain Relief
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 7/2011
After your injection for pain control: Self-care and what to expect  
Abstract: This handout explains what to do and what to expect after having an injection for pain control.
Author: Center for Pain Relief
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 9/2015
Amifostine (Ethyol)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Amifostine, including how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2003
Revised Date: 1/2011
Aripiprazole: What you should know about taking aripiprazole (Abilify)  
Abstract: Aripiprazole, also known as Abilify, is used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder. This brochure covers how to take this medication, side effects, when to call a provider, and how to learn more.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 2/2005
Autism spectrum disorders: Medications  
Abstract: This booklet details the use of medications in the treatment of the symptoms and behaviors linked to autism. Common questions are answered, and resources to learn more are listed. Also included are a behaviors and symptoms checklist and a worksheet to help make medication choices.
Author: Center on Human Development and Disability
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 2/2004
Azathioprine: Immunosuppressive medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medicine azathioprine, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Baclofen trial: Instructions for participants  
Abstract: This handout gives instructions for patients participating in a Baclofen trial at the Center for Pain Medicine. Included are directions to follow on the day of the trial, what to bring to the center, and what will happen during the center visit.
Author: Center for Pain Relief
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2008
Revised Date: 7/2011
Benefits and risks of treatment with opioids  
Abstract: This handout explains the benefits and risks of using opioid pain medicines. It explains possible side effects and safety warnings.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2012
Revised Date: 5/2012
Bupropion: What you should know about taking bupropion (Wellbutrin)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the medication bupropion, also called Wellbutrin, Wellbutrin XL, Wellbutrin SR, and Zyban. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when a health care provider should be called. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression and help people stop smoking.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Busulfan Myleran (oral) Busulfex (intravenous)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Busulfan, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2004
Revised Date: 1/2011
Citalopram: What you should know about taking citalopram (Celexa)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the medication citalopram, also known as Celexa. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Cyclophosphamide injectable (Cytoxan)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Cyclophosphamide, including how it is given intravenously, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2003
Revised Date: 1/2011
Cyclosporine: Immunosuppressive medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medicine cyclosporine, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Dapsone: Answers to common questions  
Abstract: This handout provides basic information about dapsone, an antibiotic "sulfa" drug used to treat many contagious and noncontagious skin conditions, including dermatitis herpetiformis (chronic, itchy rash), pyoderma gangrenosum (large, painful sores), vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels), Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and Sweet syndrome (painful skin sores and fever).
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 11/2010
Denileukin diftitox (Ontak)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Denileukin diftitox (Ontak), including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2004
Revised Date: 1/2011
DES (Diesthylstilbesterol)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication diethylstilbesterol (DES), a man-made version of the hormone estrogen, often used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Information includes how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 1/2011
Diphenhydramine HCl (Benadryl): Information and dosage chart  
Abstract: This handout for parents gives information, side effects, and a dosage chart for the antihistamine diphenhydramine HCl (Benadryl). This type of medicine prevents allergy symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, itching, watery eyes, and rashes or hives.
Author: Pediatric Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 9/2010
Duloxetine: What you should know about taking duloxetine  
Abstract: This flyer describes the medication duloxetine, also known as Cymbalta. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, and diabetic neuropathic pain.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Escitalopram: What you should know about taking escitalopram (Lexapro)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the medication escitalopram, also known as Lexapro. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Etanercept: Enbrel  
Abstract: This handout explains the drug etanercept. It includes how to take it, what to expect, possible side effects, and cautions.
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 3/2011
Etoposide (VePesid, VP-16)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Etoposide, includnig how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2003
Revised Date: 1/2011
Exenatide (Byetta)  
Abstract: This handout describes exenatide (Byetta), a man-made hormone that is injected to help the body release insulin when blood glucose is present. Includes side effects, drug interactions, and storage information.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 2/2012
Exparel injections: Bupivacaine liposomal  
Abstract: This handout explains a medicine called Exparel. This is a local anesthetic that is used to prevent or treat pain from some procedures.
Author: Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2017
Revised Date: 4/2017
Filgrastim (Neupogen)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Filgrastim, including how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2003
Revised Date: 1/2011
Fludarabine (Fludara)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Fludarabine, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2005
Revised Date: 1/2009
Fluoxetine: What you should know about taking fluoxetine (Prozac)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the drug fluoxetine, also known as Prozac. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and bulimia.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Glutamine  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Glutamine, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2009
Revised Date: 1/2011
Heart transplant manual: Having a heart transplant at University of Washington Medical Center  
Abstract: This document is the cover, table of contents, and introduction to UWMC's Heart Transplant Manual. Individual chapters listed in the table of contents are available as stand-alone titles on Health Online.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Herbal products: What patients who take warfarin (Coumadin) need to know  
Abstract: This brochure explains quality, safety and effectiveness issues related to the use of herbal products. The emphasis is on cautions for patients on warfarin (coumadin) treatment. Warning signs for stroke and signs and symptoms of bleeding complications are listed.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2002
Revised Date: 1/2010
Imatinib Mesylate (Gleevec)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Imatinib Mesylate, including how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions.
Author: Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2003
Revised Date: 8/2004
Inhaled colostin: Information and instructions for use  
Abstract: This handout gives instructions for mixing and using colistin, an antibiotic used to treat some bacterial lung infections. Colistin is taken as an inhaled solution through a nebulizer. Possible side effects are included. The clinician can check instructions for either 75 mg inhaled twice daily or 150 mg inhaled twice daily, depending on the patient's needs.
Author: Cystic Fibrosis Clinic/Med. Spec. Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 10/2016
Insulin pens: Basic facts  
Abstract: This handout explains what insulin is, the different types of insulin, how to store it, how to give an injection with an insulin pen, and other important information.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 8/2014
Isotretinoin: Medicine for severe acne  
Abstract: This handout gives important information about isotretinoin, a medicine used to treat severe acne. It includes precautions and side effects linked to the drug.
Author: Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2016
Revised Date: 8/2016
Liraglutide (Victoza)  
Abstract: This handout explains how to use and store liraglutide (Victoza), a man-made hormone that helps the body release insulin when blood glucose is present. It includes side effects and other cautions.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2012
Revised Date: 2/2012
Medication management: New pain medication  
Abstract: This flyer provides guidelines about obtaining medication information. It also contains contact information for questions, concerns, and refills.
Author: Center for Pain Relief
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 8/2004
Medication management: Opioid medication  
Abstract: This brochure describes the purpose, correct use, side effects, and potential risks of opioid medications prescribed for pain.
Author: Center for Pain Relief
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 8/2004
Medications to slow multiple sclerosis progression: Multiple sclerosis disease-modifying medications  
Abstract: This handout describes medications for patients with multiple sclerosis that help slow the course of the disease. Side effects are listed and results from studies on the medications are described. A chart is included to compare many medication-related factors. This document is also part of the Multiple Sclerosis Manual, which is available from Materials Management #163091.
Author: Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 3/2004
Medicines for patients with radiation to the head and neck  
Abstract: This handout describes medicines to help with mouth care and to ease the pain that occurs during radiation treatments to the head and neck.
Author: Cancer Center/Department of Radiation Oncology
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 2/2012
Medicines  
Abstract: This handout for kidney/pancreas transplant patients gives instructions for getting started with medicines - from organization to making arrangements for refills. It covers issues while at the hospital and after discharge and gives guidelines for taking medicines. This document is also a chapter in "Your Kidney/Pancreas Transplant Guide," which is available from Materials Management #171915.
Author: Transplant Services/4E-4SE/5E
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 12/2016
Medicines: For heart transplant patients (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains medicines prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Melphalan (Alkeran)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Melphaline (Alkeran), including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2004
Revised Date: 1/2011
Methorexate injections: Steps to follow  
Abstract: This handout explains the drug methotrexate, its side effects, drug interactions, and how to give yourself a subcutaneous injection.
Author: Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 12/2015
Methotrexate  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Methotrexate, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2004
Revised Date: 1/2011
Mirtazapine: What you should know about taking mirtazapine (Remeron)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the drug mirtazapine, also known as Remeron or Remeron SolTab. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, insomnia, and poor appetite.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Mycophenelate: Immunosuppressive medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medicine mycophenelate, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Olanzapine: What you should know about taking olanzapine (Zyprexa)  
Abstract: Olanzapine, also called Zyprexa, Zyprexa Zydis, and Zyprexa Intramuscular, is used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. It can also help with anxiety and sleep disorders. This brochure covers how to take this medication, side effects, when to call a provider, and how to learn more.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 2/2005
Opioid safety in the hospital: For patients taking opioid pain medicines  
Abstract: This handout gives important information about taking opioid pain medicines while you are in the hospital.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2014
Revised Date: 12/2014
Palifermin (Kepivance)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Palifermin (Kepivance), including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2009
Revised Date: 1/2011
Paroxetine: What you should know about taking paroxetine (Paxil)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the drug paroxetine, also known as Paxil. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Posaconazole (Noxafil): About your medicine  
Abstract: This handout explains the medicine posaconazole, which is used to prevent and treat fungal infections. A common brand name is Noxafil.
Author: Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 2/2015
Prednisone: Immunosuppressive medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medicine prednisone, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Preventing and treating nosebleeds: For patients on warfarin  
Abstract: This handout, for patients on warfarin, explains why nosebleeds occur, the different types of nosebleeds, prevention tips, and treatment.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 1/2010
Preventing blood clots with enoxaparin (Lovenox): Anticoagulation during or after pregnancy  
Abstract: This handout for pregnant women and new mothers gives information about using enoxaparin (Lovenox), a medicine that is used to prevent blood clots. It explains common side effects and blood clot symptoms, tells when to call the doctor, and includes instructions for safe disposal of needles and syringes ("sharps").
Author: Maternal and Infant Care Clinic (MICC)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2014
Revised Date: 2/2014
Quetiapine: What you should know about taking quetiapine (Seroquel)  
Abstract: Quetiapine, also called Seroquel, is used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. It is also used to treat anxiety and sleeping disorders. This brochure covers how to take this medication, side effects, when to call a provider, and how to learn more.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 2/2005
Risperidone: What you should know about taking risperidone (Risperdal)  
Abstract: Risperidone, also known as Risperdal, Risperdal M-Tab and Risperdal Consta, is used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. It is also used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders. This brochure covers how to take this medication, side effects, when to call a provider, and how to learn more.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 2/2005
Romiplostim (Nplate)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Romiplostim, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2009
Revised Date: 1/2011
Ruxolitinib  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Ruxolitinib, including why it is prescribed, how it should be used, special precautions to follow, and common side effects. This handout was authored by MedLinePlus and is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: MedLinePlus
Publisher/Date: MedLinePlus, 2012
Revised Date: 2/2012
Sertraline: What you should know about taking sertraline (Zoloft)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the drug sertraline, also known as Zoloft. Instructions ar given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression, anxiety, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Sexual health for hematology/oncology patients: Self-care and precautions  
Abstract: This handout gives information for cancer patients and their partners about sexual health and activity while receiving chemotherapy.
Author: 7NE/8SA Hematology/Oncology
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2016
Revised Date: 8/2016
Symlin (Pramlintide acetate)  
Abstract: This handout describes Symlin, a synthetic (man-made) hormone that works with insulin to control how quickly glucose enters the blood after meals. Side effects, drug interactions, and storage information are included.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 6/2013
Tacrolimus: Immunosuppressive medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the medicine tacrolimus, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Thiotepa (Thioplex)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Thiotepa, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2004
Revised Date: 1/2011
Topical numbing medicine: Reduce the pain  
Abstract: This handout gives instructions for use of EMLA or EMLA cream, a topical numbing agent that is used before a procedure to help lessen pain.
Author: Reconstructive Surgery
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 4/2017
Treating anemia with Aranesp: For Renal Clinic patients  
Abstract: This handout explains the causes of anemia and what tests are done to check for it. It also explains how kidney failure can lead to anemia and describes how the drug Aransesp (darbepoetin alfa) is used to treat anemia.
Author: Renal Clinic/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 4/2013
Treatment of acute multiple sclerosis attacks  
Abstract: This handout explains what to do during an acute multiple sclerosis attack and describes the treatments that may be required for serious attacks, such as corticosteroids or plasma exchange. This document is also part of the Multiple Sclerosis Manual, which is available from Materials Management #163091.
Author: Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 3/2004
Treatment with dabigatran: Pradaxa  
Abstract: This handout explains the medicine dabigatran, a drug that helps prevent blood clots. It includes how much to take, what to do if a dose is missed, what other drugs should not be taken at the same time, when to call the doctor, and possible side effects from taking this drug.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 3/2013
Treatment with rivaroxaban: Xarelto  
Abstract: This handout explains the medicine rivaroxaban, a drug that helps prevent blood clots. It includes how much to take, what to do if a dose is missed, what other drugs should not be taken at the same time, when to call the doctor, and possible side effects from taking this drug.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 3/2013
Treatment with Warfarin (Coumadin)  
Abstract: This handout describes warfarin, a medicine used to treat and prevent blood clots in the legs, lungs, heart, brain, and other parts of the body. All aspects of treatment with this medicine are covered from side effects to how to deal with a missed dose to how to monitor dietary intake of vitamin K.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2002
Revised Date: 4/2016
Treosulfan (Ovastat)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Treosulfan, including how it is given/taken, common side effects, and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2009
Revised Date: 1/2011
U-500 insulin: Basic information  
Abstract: This handout explains U-500 insulin, used by people who need high doses of insulin. Included are comparisons to U-100 insulin, how to store U-500 insulin, and cautions.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2012
Revised Date: 2/2012
Ointment dressing instructions  
Abstract: This handout explains the use of ointments to help wound healing. It gives tips on wound dressing, steps to apply dressing, types of ointments used (Bacitracin, Polysporin, and Silvadine), and how often to change dressing.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1998
Revised Date: 3/2012
Using insulin  
Abstract: This handout gives basic facts about insulin: how it affects the body, different kinds of insulin, how to store insulin, and descriptions of types of syringes and needles. Included are step-by-step instructions for patients with diabetes, showing how to give an insulin injection, and tips to reduce injection pain.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2008
Revised Date: 7/2016
Valganciclovir: Anti-viral medicine (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This appendix to the Heart Transplant Manual explains the anti-viral medicine valganciclovir, prescribed for heart transplant patients.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Venlafaxine: What you should know about taking venlafaxine (Effexor)  
Abstract: This flyer describes the drug venlafaxine, also known as Effexor and Effexor XR. Instructions are given for how to take it, what to do if a dose is missed, and when to call a health care provider. Side effects and resources to learn more are listed. This drug is used to treat depression and anxiety.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 12/2004
Vismodegib  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Vismodegib, including why it is prescribed, how it should be used, special precautions to follow, and common side effects. This handout was authored by MedLinePlus and is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: MedLinePlus
Publisher/Date: MedLinePlus, 2012
Revised Date: 3/2012
Vitamin therapy for ALS: How vitamins and supplements may help patients with ALS  
Abstract: This handout explains how vitamins and supplements may help patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Author: Neuromuscular Clinic for Swallowing and Speech Disorders
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 8/2001
Warfarin dosing calendar  
Abstract: This tool allows a patient or caregiver to record doses, test results, and appointments while on Warfarin (Coumadin) treatment.
Author: Anticoagulation Clinic/Pharmacy Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2002
Revised Date: 1/2010
Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan)  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Zevalin, including how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2012
Revised Date: 4/2012
Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan) for transplant patients  
Abstract: This handout describes the medication Zevalin as it is given to transplant patients. It includes how it is given/taken, common side effects and possible drug-drug or drug-food interactions. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2012
Revised Date: 4/2012
Ziprasidone  
Abstract: Ziprasidone, also known as Geodon, is used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. This brochure covers how to take this medication, side effects, when to call a provider, and how to learn more.
Author: Psychiatry Center (Outpatient)
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 2/2005

 
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