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Acetaminophen and ibuprofen dosage charts  
Abstract: The dosage charts in this handout give the recommended doses of acetaminophen and ibuprofen for children. These medicines are used to help lower fever and reduce pain. Dosages are based on body weight.
Author: Pediatric Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 12/2011
After your blood draw: Hematoma care instructions  
Abstract: This handout explains what to do if a hematoma forms after you have a blood draw. A hematoma is a swollen area that is filled with blood. It may form at the puncture site after a blood draw.
Author: Laboratory Medicine
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 10/2013
Choking rescue Heimlich maneuver - adults: Choking rescue first aid  
Abstract: This brochure details the causes of a blocked airway and offers tips to prevent choking. The steps for choking rescue techniques, the Heimlich maneuver, are given for a conscious adult, for an unconscious adult, and for doing it on yourself.
Author: Neuromuscular Clinic for Swallowing and Speech Disorders
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 3/2012
Prevent falls at home: a home checklist and helpful hints  
Abstract: Discusses who is at risk to fall and provides checklist of hazards and ways to prevent falls throughout the home. Includes emergency contact numbers.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2000
Revised Date: 3/2012
Prevent falls in the hospital: hospital hazards and helpful hints  
Abstract: This handout explains who is at risk to fall and why people fall while ill or in the hospital. Tips are provided for preventing falls and what to do if you do fall.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1999
Revised Date: 6/2005
Rib fractures: What you should know  
Abstract: This handout explains what to expect after a rib fracture. It includes instructions for using an incentive spirometer to help prevent pneumonia or a collapsed lung.
Author: Harborview Medical Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 7/2015
Ointment dressing instructions  
Abstract: This handout explains the use of ointments to help wound healing. It gives tips on wound dressing, steps to apply dressing, types of ointments used (Bacitracin, Polysporin, and Silvadine), and how often to change dressing.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1998
Revised Date: 3/2012
Using glucagon: For patients on insulin and their caregivers  
Abstract: This handout describes the use of glucagon, an emergency medicine used for hypoglycemia (when blood sugar drops too low). Text and illustrations cover step-by-step instructions, what to teach family and friends about using glycagon, and how to recognize and treat early symptoms of hypoglycemia.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 6/2013

 
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