PFES Logo Patient & Family Education
HEALTH Online
Our Words.    Our Care.    Online.
UWMC Logo
SEARCH  

SEARCH RESULTS
81 Item(s) Found

Citations can be viewed in three ways: Summary, Title-Abstract, and Full Record
  • A single Full-Record description can be viewed by clicking the article title
  • To see one or more articles in another view, mark the checkboxes in front of the articles desired, select the citation type here  and click  
  • To view ALL of these resources in a different view, select the citation type from the dropdown box above and click "View" without marking any checkboxes
Ready-to-print documents are available in English and non-English languages for some citations. Select a blue button next to the title to view the full-text version in the desired language. Note: The free Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view and print the documents.

1,000 calories a day: Sample diet (3-day menu)  
Abstract: This handout provides sample menus that provide a total of 1,000 calories a day.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 4/2010
2 gram (2,000 mg) sodium diet  
Abstract: This handout gives tips and information about following a low-sodium meal plan. It explains how sodium is listed on nutrition labels and gives definitions for different claims, such as "sodium free," "low sodium," and "no salt added." It also gives tips for eating out and includes a table showing which foods are OK to eat, and which ones to avoid. This information is especially helpful for patients with heart conditions or heart failure.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1999
Revised Date: 3/2013
Adjustable gastric banding: Dietary guidelines  
Abstract: This handout gives information about general nutrition and the 2 phases of liquid diet patients go through after bariatric surgery.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 2/2010
Alcohol and diabetes: Basic tips for safe use  
Abstract: This handout lists guidelines for people with diabetes to follow when using alcohol. It also lists medical conditions that require avoiding alcohol consumption. A chart listing grams of carbohydrates for different types of alcohol is included.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1994
Revised Date: 7/2016
Biotin: For healthy nails, skin, and hair  
Abstract: This handout gives general information about biotin, a B vitamin that is needed for healthy nails, skin, hair, intestines, and nervous system. Included are common doses, alternate names, side effects, and where to buy biotin.
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 11/2010
Calcium and vitamin D  
Abstract: This handout explains the nutrients calcium and vitamin D, and why they are needed by the body. It includes tables of daily requirements and the calcium and vitamin D content of certain foods. It also offers tips for choosing and taking a supplement. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Calcium and vitamin D: Why we need these nutrients  
Abstract: This handout explains why we need calcium and vitamin D, which help keep bones healthy and help prevent some cancers. Included are food sources of these nutrients, how much is needed, and how sunscreens affect vitamin D absorption.
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 11/2010
Correcting low sodium/free water retention  
Abstract: This handout explains how sodium levels can become too low, and what to do to increase sodium level. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Creating-Healthful-Meal-Plan  
Abstract: This handout for people with diabetes offers tips about planning for a shopping trip and for making good choices at the store.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2001
Revised Date: 7/2016
Diabetes basics   Japanese
Abstract: This handout gives a basic overview of diabetes management including diet, counting carbohydrates, exercise, weight loss, and monitoring of blood sugar level.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 11/2010
Diarrhea during or after cancer treatment  
Abstract: This handout explains what to do to treat diarrhea. It includes lists of foods to avoid and foods to try, recipes for "soothing beverages," and why fiber and lactose may need to be avoided. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Diet for gastroparesis: The basics  
Abstract: This handout provides basic diet information for people with gastroparesis. It gives general guidelines to follow and a list of foods to choose or avoid.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 3/2006
Diet for liver disease: The basics  
Abstract: This handout provides basic information about the diet for people with liver disease.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 3/2006
Diet guidelines for immunosuppressed patients  
Abstract: This handout explains diet guidelines for patients who have decreased immune function due to chemotherapy or radiation treatments. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2008
Revised Date: 4/2008
Discharge instructions after weight loss surgery: Self-care and nutrition  
Abstract: This handout gives instructions to follow at home after having weight loss surgery. Included are basic nutritional guidelines, physical therapy needs, follow-up clinic visits, and when to call the doctor or nurse.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 1/2016
Do you need to lose weight?  
Abstract: This handout gives tips on how to lose weight, including listening to your body, making exercise a priority, decreasing sedentary activities, decreasing portion sizes, and eating healthy foods at the right times and in the right portions.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 2/2007
Drink-a-meal  
Abstract: This booklet gives guidelines and recipes for a nutritious, varied diet for patients who have their jaw wired together (intermaxillary fixation).
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1999
Revised Date: 4/2010
Low-sodium diet: For Otolaryngology patients  
Abstract: This booklet describes a low-salt (low-sodium) diet for otolaryngology patients. Topics such as reading food labels, allowed foods, foods to avoid, and flavoring alternatives are covered.
Author: Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 4/2011
Esophageal diet after surgery: Nutrition guidelines  
Abstract: This handout gives nutritional guidelines for patients who have had surgery of the esophagus. It includes ways to meet protein and calorie needs, suggested supplements, lists of foods that are OK and not OK to eat and drink, general instructions for how and when to eat, and when to call the dietitian or diet technician.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 10/2015
Esophagectomy diet  
Abstract: This brochure offers diet guidelines to follow after having an esophagectomy, which is an operation to remove the esophagus. It includes instructions for a clear liquid diet, a full liquid diet, and how to get enough protein and calories. Tables of food groups show allowed foods and foods to avoid.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2000
Revised Date: 10/2015
Feeding infant formula to newborn babies: Getting started  
Abstract: This handout explains the 3 basic types of infant formula -- ready-to-feed, liquid concentrate, and powder -- and how to prepare them. It includes feeding tips and what to do with leftover formula.
Author: Lactation Services/Maternity and Infant Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 9/2013
Fiber  
Abstract: This handout explains what fiber is, why it is needed, and the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber. It includes a list of foods and their fiber content, sample high-fiber recipes, and tips on how to increase dietary fiber intake. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Fiber: what's in it for you?  
Abstract: This brochure explains insoluble and soluble fiber and how fiber helps you with digestion and disease prevention. Tips are offered to ensure gettnig the right amount of fiber in the diet.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1993
Revised Date: 7/2016
First 2 weeks after bariatric surgery: What you may eat and tips to help you recover  
Abstract: This handout offers guidelines to help patients choose the right foods right after bariatric sugery and for the next 2 weeks, to meet their nutritional needs and to avoid problems such as nausea, vomiting, and dumping syndrome.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 11/2014
Fluid-restricted diet: Guidelines to follow   Japanese
Abstract: This handout is for patients who have been placed on a fluid-restricted diet. It gives basic guidelines and a list of foods that should be counted as part of fluid intake. It includes a table to help with measuring fluids and tips to help with fluid control. This information is especially helpful for patients with heart conditions or heart failure.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 5/2013
Food choice lists: For carbohydrate counting  
Abstract: This handout provides a list carbohydrates, proteins, fats and "free" foods to be used when counting carbohydrates ("carbs"). A table supplies the carbohydrate grams found in various "carb choices." This information is used most often by patients who have diabetes.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 7/2016
Food labels: Using the "Nutrition Facts" label to count carbohydrates and choose heart-healthy foods  
Abstract: This handout explains how to read food labels and how people with diabetes can use that information to make healthy food choices. Sections include "Using the 'Nutrition Facts' Label," "About Foods Made for People with Diabetes," and "Carbohydrates that Have Less Effect on Blood Glucose."
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2008
Revised Date: 7/2016
Food records  
Abstract: This booklet provides forms for recording daily food and fluid intake for 7 days. Patients are instructed to record each entry as soon as possible after each meal or snack. Spaces are included for writing in the amount of food or fluid and how it was prepared.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2000
Revised Date: 5/2013
Food safety guidelines during chemotherapy and radiation  
Abstract: This handout explains the importance of food safety when receiving cancer treatment. It gives important tips about washing hands and surfaces, avoiding cross-contamination, keeping foods at safe temperatures, and more. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2014
Revised Date: 3/2014
Food safety: For patients having chemotherapy or radiation therapy  
Abstract: This handout is for patients having chemotherapy or radiation therapy. It explains foodborne illness and why food safety is so important for people having cancer treatments. It includes important "steps to food safety" and gives specific guidelines for avoiding contamination at home and at the grocery store. Content of this handout is adapted from "Food Safety Guidelines" by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 3/2015
Foods for sick days   Japanese Arabic
Abstract: Lists food exchanges and provides guidelines for diabetes management on sick days, including carbohydrate consumption for high or low blood glucose.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1995
Revised Date: 4/2011
Foods that irritate your bladder  
Abstract: This handout explains what foods and beverages can irritate the bladder. It also gives suggestions for replacing these with other foods.
Author: Patient Care Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2009
Revised Date: 3/2015
Free water restriction: While you are in the hospital  
Abstract: This handout explains what to expect if you are on free water restriction while you are in the hospital.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 1/2015
Gastrectomy diet: Nutrition guidelines  
Abstract: This handout gives dietary guidelines to follow after having a gastrectomy, surgery to remove some or all of the stomach. After a gastrectomy, people usually need to eat soft foods that are high in protein and low in sugar. The handout includes an explanation of "dumping syndrome" and how to prevent it, tables listing foods that are OK and foods to avoid on a soft gastrectomy diet, special drink recipes, and a sample menu.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 10/2015
Gastroparesis: Diet and nutrition suggestions for people with diabetes  
Abstract: This handout gives diet and nutrition tips for patients with gastroparesis, who also have diabetes. It includes common symptoms, tips to help digestion, and suggestions for a sample diet of 6 small meals a day.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 4/2011
Getting enough protein and calories: Nutrition to support your healing  
Abstract: This booklet contains guidelines to help meet protein and calorie needs. It contains tips for boosting protein and calories, a list of liquid supplements, a list of protein sources, and several drink recipes.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2000
Revised Date: 10/2010
Glycemic index  
Abstract: This handout compares the impact of carbohydrates on blood sugar levels, in comparision to an equivalent amount of glucose.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 1992
Revised Date: 3/2010
Healthy and high calorie snacks  
Abstract: This handout gives ideas for healthy and high-calorie snacks that may be helpful for patients with poor appetites, such as those who are having cancer treatment. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Heart-healthy guidelines  
Abstract: This handout reviews the guidelines for living a heart-healthy lifestyle, as provided by the American Heart Association. Included are tips on diet, exercise, emphasizing "good" fats, and limiting sodium and sugar intake.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 2/2012
High-protein foods: Helping you increase the protein in your diet  
Abstract: This handout explains why eating high-protein foods is important for someone who will be having surgery. It includes tips for adding protein to the diet, and examples of protein-rich foods.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 8/2010
Home tube feeding guide  
Abstract: This booklet provides instructions for tube feeding and offers tips for preventing or managing common side effects, including diarrhea, constipation, stomach upset, and dehydration. Includes simple illustrations showing a gastrostomy tube and pump and gravity drip methods of feeding.
Author: Nutrition Clinic/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 11/2009
Iron supplements: What they are for and how to find the right kind for you  
Abstract: This handout explains about iron supplements and why a dermatologist may recommend them. It includes possible side effects and product examples.
Author: Dermatology Center/Med Spec Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 3/2011
J-Pouch nutritional guidelines  
Abstract: This handout provides guidelines about food choices after J-pouch adaptation surgery (also called ileostomy takedown) to help regulate the bowels.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 9/2009
Lactose intolerance  
Abstract: This handout explains lactose intolerance and its symptoms. It includes tables with the lactose content of certain foods and showing suggested doses of Lactaid tablets. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Limited fiber diet: After surgery  
Abstract: This handout explains a low-fiber diet for patients after surgery. It provides sample menus for 2 days, and includes a table of foods that are OK to eat and foods that should be avoided.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 4/2015
Limiting fluids: When you are on a fluid restriction  
Abstract: This handout explains what to expect if you are on a fluid restriction diet while you are in the hospital. This information is especially helpful for patients with heart conditions or heart failure.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 1/2015
Low fiber diet: Recommendations  
Abstract: This handout lists foods to eat and foods to avoid for patients who have been advised to eat a diet that is low fiber.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2004
Revised Date: 7/2015
Low-iodine diet  
Abstract: This handout describes a low-iodine diet (less than 50 micrograms per day). Included are lists of foods that can be eaten and foods to avoid while on the diet.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 5/2010
Low-potassium diet: The basics  
Abstract: This handout provides basic diet information about a low-potassium diet.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 3/2006
Low-sodium diet: The basics  
Abstract: This handout provide basic information about a low-sodium diet.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 3/2006
Low-sugar special drink recipes  
Abstract: This handout contains recipes for low-sugar drinks that can be made at home to supplement an oral diet. Flavors are suggested, but may be altered to suit individual tastes.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 3/2010
Magnesium  
Abstract: This handout defines magnesium and its important function in the body. It explains what causes low magnesium levels and gives magnesium content of selected foods. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Magnesium in your diet  
Abstract: This handout explains why magnesium is important to the body, and how some medicines promote magnesium loss. Included is a list of foods and drinks that are high in magnesium.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 10/2010
Make every bite count: Increase your calorie and protein intake with quality foods  
Abstract: This handout for patients receiving cancer treatment explains how to optimize the nutritional value of their diet. It provides lists of healthy foods to include, what to eat that doesn't require cooking, and recipes for smoothies and other healthy meals. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Managing reflux: Dietary guidelines for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)  
Abstract: This handout explains dietary chages to help lessen the likelihood of reflux, and to avoid irritation of sensitive or inflamed esophageal tissue. These changes are recommended for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Included are lists of foods that are usually tolerated and those that may cause problems.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 6/2010
Mindful eating: Your health depends on how you eat  
Abstract: This handout explains that the ability of your body to easily use the food you eat is affected by where you are, your state of mind, how fast you eat, and how much you pay attention to the process of eating. This handout gives tips to help you increase mindful eating. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Nausea during pregnancy: Tips to help prevent nausea and vomiting  
Abstract: This handout offers tips to help prevent nausea and vomiting (morning sickness) that often occurs in the early months of pregnancy.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 3/2007
Nutrition after your transplant  
Abstract: This booklet gives dietary tips for patients who have had a transplant. Included are: the nutritional effects of medicines; needs for protein, sodium, potassium and calcium; weight and exercise; low-bacteria diet; and food safety. Space is provided for a dietitian to fill in information specific to the patient.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2002
Revised Date: 9/2016
Nutrition after your whipple surgery: Helping your recover  
Abstract: This handout gives diet tips for patients who have had whipple surgery at University of Washington Medical Center. It explains why a special diet is needed and gives lists of foods to eat and foods to avoid.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2015
Revised Date: 5/2016
Nutrition for a healthy heart recovery: A guide to eating after cardiac surgery  
Abstract: This handout details some of the common eating-related responses to coronary artery bypass or valve surgery. It offers suggestions for dealing with loss of appetite, combating constipation, and eating right to help the body heal and fight infection.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 3/2010
Nutrition tips to help prevent nausea and vomiting  
Abstract: This handout offers tips for preventing nausea and vomiting. Included are recommendations for what to eat and how to eat, and what to do at times other than mealtimes.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 8/2007
Nutrition: After your heart transplant (Heart Transplant Manual)  
Abstract: This chapter of the Heart Transplant Manual provides guidelines for nutrition after heart transplant.
Author: Cardiac Transplant Service
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 10/2012
Nutrition  
Abstract: This handout for kidney/pancreas transplant patients gives guidelines for healthy eating before and after transplantation. This document is also a chapter in "Your Kidney/Pancreas Transplant Guide," which is available from Materials Management #171915.
Author: Transplant Services/4E-4SE/5E
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2003
Revised Date: 12/2016
Patient journal: Your 3-day record  
Abstract: This 3-day journal provides blank tables for a patient to record their food and fluid intake and tube feedings, medicines, symptoms, and side effects. A short list of measurement conversions is included, as well as a severity scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being "None" and 10 being "Intolerable."
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 2/2010
PCOS nutrition: Eating for health when you have polycystic ovarian syndrome  
Abstract: This handout gives dietary guidelines for women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). It includes sections on eating a balanced diet, planning meals and snacks, healthy eating tips, and moving for health.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 4/2015
Phosphorus  
Abstract: This handout explains the mineral phosphorus, why it is needed in the body, and what to do if phosphorus level is too high or too low. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Potassium  
Abstract: This handout explains the mineral potassium, why it is needed by the body, and what to do if the potassium level is too high or too low. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Potassium in foods  
Abstract: This handout lists the amount of potassium in many foods. This information is helpful for patients who have been advised to limit the amount of potassium in their diet. These are guidelines only.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 10/2011
Radiation Oncology recipes  
Abstract: This collection of recipes is designed for patients having radiation treatment for cancer. It includes recipe and diet suggestions to help keep up strength, rebuild tissue, protect against infection, and handle the side effects of treatment better. Sections include: Soups; Dips, Spreads, and Side Dishes; Easy Main Dishes; On the Sweeter Side (fruit treats, smoothies, and classic favorites); Special Solutions (for help with thick secretions, constipation, dry mouth, and taste changes); Protein Waters and Fruit Drinks; and Additives and Special Supplements (low-sugar, high-protein, high-calorie, and high fiber options).
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2013
Revised Date: 3/2013
Reading nutrition labels  
Abstract: This handout explains the kinds of information contained in the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2006
Revised Date: 5/2011
Sensible snacks: For people with diabetes  
Abstract: This handout explains how snacks can be part of a healthy meal plan. It includes examples of carbohydrate snacks, low-calorie snacks, and protein snacks.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 7/2016
Sources of dietary fat: Heart-healthy eating for people with diabetes  
Abstract: This handout explains the different types of fat: monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, saturated, hydrogenated (trans fats), and Omega-3 fatty acids. Included are tips for eating the healthiest types of fats for a healthy heart, and lists of foods that contain the different fat types.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2007
Revised Date: 7/2016
Sweeteners: For people with diabetes  
Abstract: This handout, written for people with diabetes, gives information about many common sweeteners and how they may be used in a meal plan.
Author: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2002
Revised Date: 7/2016
Taking vitamins and minerals after bariatric surgery: Guidelines to follow  
Abstract: This handout gives general guidelines for adding specific vitamins and minerals to the diet to prevent nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.
Author: Nutrition Clinic
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 11/2012
Taste changes due to treatment  
Abstract: This handout for cancer patients explains why the sense of taste can change during treatment. It describes a taste called "umami," a Japanese word that refers to the brothy, meaty taste and feel of many foods. Eating foods with umami has been shown to help with digestion and increase the amount of food eaten. Included is a list of foods with high levels of umami and ways to increase umami in foods. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Tips to minimize taste changes  
Abstract: This handout describes the taste changes some cancer patients experience, often from treatment. Tips are offered to help adapt to these changes.
Author: Cancer Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 7/2005
PEG tube placement: How to prepare  
Abstract: This handout tells how to prepare for an upper endoscopy and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement. The PEG tube allows nutrition, fluids, and/or medicines to be put directly into the patient's stomach.
Author: Digestive Health Center
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2005
Revised Date: 4/2016
Very low calorie diet using prepared foods  
Abstract: This handout explains a Very Low Calorie Diet (1,000 calories a day) for patients who want to use prepared foods. This diet is prescribed before surgery to help decrease the size of the patient's liver. Included are a meal plan and a list of daily servings allowed.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 5/2015
Very low calorie diet: Preparing your own meals  
Abstract: This handout explains a Very Low Calorie Diet (1,000 calories a day) for patients who want to cook their own meals. This diet is prescribed before surgery to help decrease the size of the patient's liver. Included are a meal plan and a list of daily servings allowed.
Author: Surgical Specialties Center/Surgical Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2010
Revised Date: 5/2015
Whole foods: The building blocks of health (phytonutrients)  
Abstract: This handout explains the important of eating whole foods for health, and how processed or refined foods remove important nutrients. It defines "phytonutrients," why they are important, and how to make sure there are plenty of these vital nutrients in the diet. Authored by Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this information is made available to UWMC clinicians by agreement between SCCA and UWMC, as a service to the patients who visit both health care facilities.
Author: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Publisher/Date: Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011
Your protein needs  
Abstract: This handout gives the protein content of various foods and supplements.
Author: Food and Nutrition Services
Publisher/Date: University of Washington Medical Center, 2011
Revised Date: 1/2011

 
The health education materials accessed through this site are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other health care provider with any questions you may have about a medical condition.
If you think you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 9-1-1 immediately.